John DeCarlo, Ph.D.

John DeCarlo Headshot
Professor
Director, Master's Program in Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice Department
Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences
Education

Ph.D. City University of New York Graduate Center
M.Phil. City University of New York Graduate Center
M.A. John Jay College of Criminal Justice
M.S. Tiffin University

About John

John DeCarlo is a nationally recognized expert in community policing and on perceptions of race in policing. He previously was a member of the Branford Police force for 34 years, including six years as chief

Dr. DeCarlo’s current research focuses on police contagion shooting, looking closely at what causes violence to escalate. He is the co-principal investigator on a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant to study racial profiling.

The co-author of three books and numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals, Dr. DeCarlo’s book, Police Leaders in the New Community Problem-Solving Era, examines community policing in Boston, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, and Newark, studying how police leaders successfully implemented community-policing strategies.

His research focuses on police management, police unions, policing methods, and eye witness identification. His published work includes "Perceptual Differences between Police and Citizens Encountering Weapons Focus Effect" in Police Quarterly and "Does Video Recording Alter the Behavior of Police During Interrogation? A Mock Crime-and-Investigation Study" in Law and Human Behavior.

His wide-ranging research interests also include environmental criminology. Exploring the effect of weather and environmental variables on crime, Dr. DeCarlo discovered that many long-held myths on weather and lunar cycles and their impact on crime appear to be untrue.

As police chief in Branford, Dr. DeCarlo was credited with making the department a model of community policing. He works closely with the New 51 Police Department, looking at gang affiliation and differential association, and at ways to thwart gun violence through the collaborative efforts of police, parole, probation, and the larger community.

The founder of the Center for Advanced Policing at the University of New 51 and co-founder of NexGen Solutions, Inc., Dr. DeCarlo was previously the coordinator of the Police Studies program at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He received his Ph.D. in criminal justice and a master’s degree from the City University of New York Graduate Center. He also earned an M.A. from John Jay College of Criminal Justice and an M.S. from Tiffin University. He currently serves as chair of the police section of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.

Often quoted in the media about police issues, Dr. DeCarlo has been featured on CBS News, NPR’s All Things Considered, Al Jazeera Television, and in the New 51 Register. A widely sought-after speaker, he participated in Yale University’s Seminar on Racial Disparity in Criminal Justice and the Vera Institute’s conference on Police Change and Legitimacy.

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Selected Publications
  • Book — An Introduction to Police Science – Kendall Hunt Publishing — (2022)
  • Book — Criminal Justice Management and Leadership – Cognella Academic Publishing — (2022)
  • Book — Police Science: Key Readings – Cognella Academic Publishing — (2021)
  • Peer reviewed article — A Comparison of the Eyewitness Accuracy of Police Officers and Civilians - (2020)
  • Peer reviewed article — An Exploratory Study of Police Officers: Low Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue — (2019)
  • Kassin, S., Lawson, V., Kuchuka, J. & DeCarlo, J. (2016). Police reports of mock suspect interrogations: A test of accuracy and perception. Law & Human Behavior, Online First, 1-15.
  • DeCarlo, J., Jenkins, M. (2015). Labor Unions, Management Innovation and Organizational Change in Police Departments. Springer Publishing.
  • Book – Police Unions and Innovation, With Michael Jenkins, Police Unions – Springer Publishing – (2015)
  • Book Review, September 2015 – Ghettoside, Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Volume XLII, Number 3
  • Book Chapter on Amadou Diallo in African Americans and Criminal Justice: An Encyclopedia (2015) Jones-Brown, D and Frazier, B. Greenwood Press, New York
  • Peer reviewed Journal Article – FBI Law Enforcement News – May, 2014, with Michael Jenkins, A critical Evaluation of Executive Level Police Training – US Gov. Printing Office
  • Book – Police Leaders in the New Community Problem Solving Era. With Michael Jenkins, Innovations in Policing – Carolina Academic Press – (2014)
  • Peer reviewed Journal Article – Kassin, Lawson, Kuchuka and DeCarlo, (2012), Effects of video cameras on interrogation – Law and human behavior
  • Peer reviewed Journal Article – DeCarlo, J. Sedelmaier, C & Jenkins, M. (2012), Criminal Path Mapping And Its Relationship To Environmental Crime Theories, International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA) Journal, 21, 1
  • Peer reviewed Journal Article - International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning – A Phenomenological Examination of Student Self Efficacy in Distance Learning – July, 2004
Grants

DeCarlo, J (2015)South Norwalk Against Crime BCJI P1.
DeCarlo, J (2016) NSF – Racial profiling study NSF LSS.

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In the Media

In the Media

John DeCarlo, professor and director of the Master’s Program in Criminal Justice, comments on the number of public service employees working overtime in Southington as shortages continue to be an issue throughout the state.

In the Media

Michael Lawlor, associate professor of criminal justice, and John DeCarlo, professor and director of the Master’s Program in Criminal Justice, comment on how police departments can discipline officers. Appeals can be made to an arbitrator panel to overrule the discipline decision.

In the Media

John DeCarlo, professor and director of the Master’s Program in Criminal Justice, comments on how George Kelling’s theory, developed in the 1980s, is being used as New York is dealing with serious crime in the subways again.